2016-2017 Week #16 Mount Vernon Winter League Results and Standings

  2016-2017  (WEEK #16)

RESULTS

POINTS SCORED WINS TEAM NAME TEAM NAME WINS POINTS SCORED
36 10 CORONA ABC 0 21
36 10 INDEPENDENT LIGHTS OUT 0 11
21 3 SCHIACCIA PALLE YONKERS 7 32
27 3 WHITESTONE ITRI VINO-007 7 35
36 10 DALMACIA ZADAR 0 5
26 3 MOUNT VERNON PARKSIDE 7 35

 

 STANDINGS

 TEAM

 WON  LOST  PTS  FOR  PTS AGST

 DIFF +/- 

1ST DALMACIA 126 34 502 337 165
2ND CORONA 120 40 517 354 163
3RD INDEPENDENT 112 48 510 362 148
4TH YONKERS 107 53 471 350 121
5TH ZADAR 98.5 61.5 467 397 70
6TH PARKSIDE 71 89 425 488 -63
7TH WHITESTONE 67 93 441 467 -26
8TH MOUNT VERNON 66 94 413 460 -47
9TH LIGHTS OUT 53.5 106.5 389 484 -95
10TH ABC 52 108 406 509 -103
11TH SCHIACCIA PALLE 51 109 370 489 -119
12TH ITRI VINO-007 36 124 314 528 -214
960 960 5225 5225 0

2016-2017 Week #15 Mount Vernon Winter League Results and Standings

  2016-2017  (WEEK #15)

RESULTS

POINTS SCORED WINS TEAM NAME TEAM NAME WINS POINTS SCORED
35 7 LIGHTS OUT ABC 3 31
12 3 YONKERS ZADAR 7 30
0 0 ITRI VINO-007 SCHIACCIA PALLE 10 36
29 4 MOUNT VERNON DALMACIA 6 28
26 3 CORONA WHITESTONE 7 31
32 7 PARKSIDE INDEPENDENT 3 29

 

 STANDINGS

 TEAM

 WON  LOST  PTS  FOR  PTS AGST

 DIFF +/- 

1ST DALMACIA 116 34 466 332 134
2ND CORONA 110 40 481 333 148
3RD INDEPENDENT 102 48 474 351 123
4TH YONKERS 100 50 439 329 110
5TH ZADAR 98.5 51.5 462 361 101
6TH WHITESTONE 64 86 414 432 -18
7TH PARKSIDE 64 86 390 462 -72
8TH MOUNT VERNON 63 87 387 425 -38
9TH LIGHTS OUT 53.5 96.5 378 448 -70
10TH ABC 52 98 385 473 -88
11TH SCHIACCIA PALLE 48 102 349 457 -108
12TH ITRI VINO-007 29 121 279 501 -222
900 900 4904 4904 0

2016-2017 Week #14 Mount Vernon Winter League Results and Standings

  2016-2017  (WEEK #14)

RESULTS

POINTS SCORED WINS TEAM NAME TEAM NAME WINS POINTS SCORED
21 3 PARKSIDE YONKERS 7 27
36 10 WHITESTONE LIGHTS OUT 0 23
15 0 SCHIACCIA PALLE DALMACIA 10 36
12 0 MOUNT VERNON CORONA 10 36
24 3 INDEPENDENT ZADAR 7 32
31 7 ABC ITRI VINO-007 3 25

 

 STANDINGS

 TEAM

 WON  LOST  PTS  FOR  PTS AGST

 DIFF +/- 

1ST DALMACIA 110 30 438 303 135
2ND CORONA 107 33 455 302 153
3RD INDEPENDENT 99 41 445 319 126
4TH YONKERS 97 43 427 299 128
5TH ZADAR 91.5 48.5 432 349 83
6TH MOUNT VERNON 59 81 358 397 -39
7TH WHITESTONE 57 83 383 406 -23
8TH PARKSIDE 57 83 358 433 -76
9TH ABC 49 91 354 438 -84
10TH LIGHTS OUT 46.5 93.5 343 417 -74
11TH SCHIACCIA PALLE 38 102 313 457 -143
12TH ITRI VINO-007 29 111 279 465 -186
840 840 4585 4585 0

2016-2017 Week #13 Mount Vernon Winter League Results and Standings

  2016-2017  (WEEK #13)

RESULTS

POINTS SCORED WINS TEAM NAME TEAM NAME WINS POINTS SCORED
32 4 ZADAR SCHIACCIA PALLE 6 30
25 0 LIGHTS OUT MOUNT VERNON 10 36
16 0 ITRI VINO-007 CORONA 10 36
25 3 DALMACIA PARKSIDE 7 33
33 7 INDEPENDENT ABC 3 25
18 0 WHITESTONE YONKERS 10 36

 

 STANDINGS

 TEAM

 WON  LOST  PTS  FOR  PTS AGST

 DIFF +/- 

1ST DALMACIA 100 30 402 288 114
2ND CORONA 97 33 419 290 129
3RD INDEPENDENT 96 34 421 287 134
4TH YONKERS 90 40 400 278 122
5TH ZADAR 84.5 45.5 400 325 75
6TH MOUNT VERNON 59 71 346 361 -15
7TH PARKSIDE 54 76 337 406 -69
8TH WHITESTONE 47 83 347 383 -36
9TH LIGHTS OUT 46.5 83.5 320 381 -61
10TH ABC 42 88 323 413 -90
11TH SCHIACCIA PALLE 38 92 298 421 -123
12TH ITRI VINO-007 26 104 254 434 -180
780 780 4267 4267 0

History Of Bocce

History Of Bocce

 

Editors note: There seem to be numerous versions, each slightly different. The following information is a compilation fromvarious sources. If you have others, please pass them on.

Bocce Player     Bocce is an ancient game, its birth lost in the shadows of antiquity. During a game a ball is rolled down a lane with the aim of coming to rest near a smaller object ball called a pallina or jack or cue. Not only is it among the earliest known outdoor pastimes, but it is played in more countries than any other ball game, with the exception of soccer. Some authorities claim it originated in Egypt about 5200 B.C.; others, that the game was started in Greece during the 6th Century B.C. The most reliable sources agree that Bocce, as we know it today, was played between battles during Rome’s Punic Wars against Carthage, which started in 264 B.C. Soldiers selected a small stone called a “leader” and threw it first. Then larger stones would be thrown at the “leader” and the stone coming closest to it would score. The game provided exercise and relaxation for the soldiers. Teams were composed of two, four, six, or eight men and the score would vary from 16 to 24 points per game.

     Through succeeding centuries, the Romans spread the popularity of the game throughout the empire, which during this period encompassed vast areas of Europe, Asia and North Africa. However, with the fall of the Roman Empire and onset of the Middle Ages, direct evidence of the game is again obscured for several centuries.

Ancient Bocce court     During the same period, Vulgar Latin emerged as a dominant language of the common man. The Vulgar Latin word “bottia” – meaning ball – is the root of the Italian word boccia or Bocce, as the game came to be known. Similarly in Classic Latin – that which prevailed during the days of Caesar – the word “boulles” – which again means ball – is the root for another very similar form of the game – “bowls” – which later emerged in the British Isles, today known as England. Here the game was refined from that of simply tossing the ball to include rolling it on the lawn or green. Thus, the term “bowling on the green” or simply “bowls”.

     From the first days of the game’s popularity in England, kings frowned upon it, as it was likely to seduce their subjects away from archery practice – deemed of greater importance to the safety of England. The game continued to be played until 1319 when Holy Roman Emperor Charles IV ordered its discontinuance as he thought that, because of its popularity, it would interfere with sports of a more military nature. Richard II prohibited the game. Also, during the reigns of Henry IV and Edward IV, the ban was renewed, but for commoners only.

     Years later the prohibition was lifted when the Medical Faculty at Montepelier, France, declared that Bocce was the best exercise to prevent rheumatism.

     An interesting historical note on Bocce claims that the English Admiral, Sir Francis Drake, was informed of the approaching Spanish Armada while playing a game of Bocce. Drake, in his usual cool manner, replied: “First, we finish the game; then we have time for the Invincible Armada.” It is apparent also that by this time women played as well as men. Shakespeare mentioned the game in several of his plays. In Richard II, for example, a lady of the court suggests the queen should play a game of “bowls”.

     Bocce was played throughout Europe. Emperors, Admirals, Generals, poets, sculptors, scientists and men from all stations of life were active participants in the sport. It was a favorite with Giuseppe Garibaldi.

     Throughout history innumerable Bocce games have been played in the streets, alleys, squares and country greens of every European country and in North and South America. Lovers of Bocce will play wherever there is adequate space available. Pennsylvanians are fortunate in their Bocce facilities. In Philadelphia alone there are 17 Bocce Clubs. There are many other clubs throughout the state.

A shorter more lighthearted account comes from Michael Kilian of the Chicago Tribune.

     Some historians claim bocce dates back 7,000 years. The Egyptians played it when they weren’t struggling with pyramid stones, and the Romans picked it up from them (I don’t think Cleopatra did, however, as it’s not a game you can play in bed).

     The barbarians within the Roman Empire took a liking to it – the Gauls producing a French version called “boule.” The English, who never quite got the hang of things, turned it into the tacky pastime you see on television’s “Championship Bowling.”

     Unlike “Championship Bowling,” bocce is not a game of roll, slam, crash, rack and have another brewski. It’s a true sport involving skill, fitness, strategy and cunning.

Credit : http://www.bocce.baltimore.md.us/boccehistory.html

Bocce Rules

Open Rules

The United States Bocce Federation is a nonprofit, charitable corporation organized to promote the sport of Bocce through education and amateur competition and any funds received are used strictly for this objective. The USBF is the only internationally sanctioned governing body for Bocce in the United States. The USBF is also a member of the Federation International de Boules and the Confederazione Boccistica Internazionale.

THE EVOLUTION OF RULES

Who can play Bocce?

Everyone can play! There is no race, sex, or age discrimination in the sport of Bocce. It is played all over the world and is part of the International Special Olympics and the Senior Olympic

What do you need to play?

You need a set of 8 balls, four for each team, with different colors and a target ball called a “jack” or “pallino”. It is also helpful to have some type of measuring device. Tape measures are commonly used as well as antennae, expanding pens, ETC.

How many people on a Team?

Games can be played one-on-one (singles), pairs (doubles), triples, or foursomes. In USBF format, singles are played with each person throwing 4 balls and alternating use of each end of the court. In doubles (pairs), each team member throws 2 balls and again alternate use of each end of the court. Triples have become the newest format and 12 balls are used instead of 8. Play is the same as Doubles with each team member throwing 2 balls and alternating use of each end of the court. Foursomes should be played with 2 members of a team stationed at opposite ends of the court and playing 2 balls each. Variations to the foursome style are used in some regions of the USA and certainly are permissible and at the discretion of Tournament directors or organizers.

Court Dimensions:

Official courts are 86.92’ in length and 13.12’ in width. Unofficial courts can be smaller. Court surface has the greatest variation found in the USA. Some examples are: carpet, crushed stone, dirt, oyster shells, clay, and most recently synthetic carpets and poured liquid creating a smooth, extremely fast surface.

Ball Size:

The USBF recommends for tournament play: 107 mm Diameter and 920 grams (approx 2 lbs) in Weight. Usually Tournament Directors will announce if only “house balls” can be used. The USBF allows players to use their own set as long as the specifications are approved prior to the start of the games.

Foul Lines:

  •  Should be clearly marked both on court surface and side boards
  •  There should only be one line for pointing and shooting and the recommendation is 13’ from the back wall.

Players may step on but not have their foot completely over the foul line before releasing the pallino or the bocce ball.

Start the game!

Begin the game with a flip of a coin between the Captains of each team. The winner of the coin flip will determine the end from which play will start and also has control of the pallino. The losing team chooses the color of balls it wants to use (applies when “house” balls are used). Coin toss winner throws the pallino.

  •  Toss is valid if the pallino passes center line and does not touch the back wall on opposite end.
  •  If the player fails to place the pallino in valid area, the opposing team will put the pallino in play.
  •  If both players fail, the pallino returns to the original team for an additional attempt. Alternating process continues until pallino is in valid position.
  •  The Team that originally tossed the pallino will play the first ball. The Game!
  •  The first ball may be rolled by ANY member of the Team that originally threw the pallino. Winners of coin toss or previous frame
  •  Should the rolled ball hit the backboard without touching the pallino, it is a dead ball and removed from the court.
  •  The same Team must throw again and continue rolling until a valid point is established.
  •  Once the point is established, the opposing Team must point or shoot until they make a new (closer) point.
  •  Players may use side boards at any time.
  •  Balls can be measured at any time and, in case of doubt, an official referee or Tournament official should be called. In the event a tie is determined, the last Team to roll a ball must roll again until the tie is broken.
  •  If after all balls are played there is still a tie, no points are awarded and play resumes with the Team last scoring tossing the pallino from the opposite end of the court.
  •  In the event a ball/balls are moved during a measurement by an official, the balls are returned to approximate positions and official will still make the call. If however, a member of a Team currently playing measures and moves a ball, the point is awarded to the opposing team. In any case, the decision of a referee or official is final.
  •  One Team Member can cross the centerline to measure balls. Other players need to remain at their respective end of the court.

Backboard:

• If a ball hits the backboard without first touching another ball or pallino, it is a dead ball and removed from the court.

• If a ball is shot, hits the backboard illegally and then strikes a stationary ball/s, the shot ball is removed from the court and the stationary ball/s are placed in their approximate original position/s

• The pallino is always a valid target and remains in play even if it strikes the back wall after being struck by any valid ball during a frame. If however, the pallino is knocked out of the court or bounces back in front of the center line, the frame is considered void and the Team that started the frame will begin again at the opposite end of the court.

• In the event ball/s resting against a backboard are moved as a result of a valid shot, they remain in their new position. If however they move as a result of an invalid shot, they are returned to their approximate original positions.

Scoring:

• Only one team scores in a frame (unless there is a tie)

• Games are usually played to 12 points

• Final games are usually played to 15 points (USBF recommended)

• Tournament Directors can decide any variation to game points but should do so prior to the start of the event. Illegal movement of balls or the pallino:

• Players should never touch or move any ball or the pallino until frame has ended. If a player moves a ball prior to the end of a frame (thinking play is over) and the balls cannot be accurately relocated to their positions, all remaining non-thrown balls of the nonoffending team are counted as points. If the offense is committed by the playing team, all non-thrown balls of that team are voided and the frame is over.

• ALL players should be out of the court if possible. If not possible, they should be positioned in front of play area when a player at the opposite end is shooting.

• If a player is in the court standing BEHIND the point balls and pallino (In harm’s way or “downstream”) and is struck by a ball or pallino as a result of a raffa or volo shot, the opposing team receives the Rule of Advantage! The options are o Leave all balls and pallino in the new configuration. or o Remove the ball or pallino that struck their opponent from the court. If the pallino is removed from the court, the frame is over and play begins from the opposite end. or o They can place the ball or pallino that struck their opponent anywhere on the court. If however, the player is standing in front of the point balls or pallino (Out of Harms way or “upstream”), and is struck by a ball that moves backwards toward a player as the result of a raffa or volo shot, the ball remains in play because the player was in a valid position. In the event the pallino moves backward and touches a player the frame is over and play begins from the opposite end. If a player is struck by a ball or pallino in a point attempt or lag, the Rule of Advantage applies no matter where the player was standing.

Shooting and Pointing:

• There are basically two (2) types of shooting.

• Volo: the act of lofting the ball in the air attempting to hit the target. Tournament Directors may for safety concerns determine that Volo shooting may not be allowed. If it is allowed the USBF uses the same foul line for both raffa and volo shooting.

• Raffa: the act of shooting at a target either by releasing the ball at ground level, slightly lofting the ball or rolling the ball in a forceful manner.

• Pointing is done with either foot or both feet before or on the pointing line. A throw is valid as long as any part of the foot/feet is on the line.

• When shooting (either style) the player is allowed to step on the line prior to releasing the ball. As long as even the heel is on the line, it is a valid shot.

• Once a player has released the ball, he/she is allowed to continue steps up to the center line. This is considered valid.

Late arrivals, substitutions, delays, etc:

• A team not present within 15 minutes of scheduled start of the game will forfeit the game.

• In a tournament where substitutes are allowed, a Team may substitute only once during a game and it must be announced to the opposing Team before the start of the next frame.

• A substituted player may not return to that game. If a player/s arrive late, the game will start with that Team playing shorthanded and minus the appropriate number of balls. Player may then enter game at “shorthanded” end after frame is completed. In the event a player must leave a game in progress, an alternate may enter at the end of a frame and the player that leaves cannot return for remainder of game. If no alternate is available, the game continues using the late arrival rule.

• Repeated “conferences” during a frame causing delays in the game are discouraged. If delays continue, the offended Team Captain should notify an official.

• If an official issues a one-minute warning and delays continue, the “burned ball” rule should be placed in effect and one of the offending player’s balls will be removed from the court.

Game Notes:

• Consecutive or alternating throws by teammates shall be at the option of the players.

• Any time a player is in action, opposing players should be off the court or far behind the player if courts don’t have adequate space.

• If a player plays the wrong color ball, simply replace it with the correct color when it comes to rest. Play continues.

• If a player commits a foot foul while in the act of shooting volo or raffa, a warning is issued for the first offense. Should the same player foul again, the thrown ball is removed from play and all struck balls returned to their approximate original positions. USBF NOTE: Unless there is a referee in the court, this would be a very difficult rule to enforce and should be addressed by the tournament Director before tournament begins END NOTE

• If a player rolls/shoots out of turn or plays more balls than allowed, the opposing team has two (2) options. Leave all balls as they rest, or remove the illegally thrown ball from play and return all other ball/s to previous position/s. Summary: The intent of the USBF Open Rules is to provide a guideline for playing a game of Bocce. These rules are used in all sanctioned USBF tournaments and are strongly recommended for any tournament at any level from social to competitive. For further information or questions regarding these rules, court construction, USBF events, etc.,

please contact the USBF @ www.bocce.com definitive guide to the sport